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Nielsen Tam, a longtime educator and second-term school board member hailed as a soft-spoken champion for Alameda’s youth and for equity in the Island’s schools, died Sunday night after a months-long battle with leukemia. He was 69.

“Niel helped us move forward as a school district and as a community, without looking for his own personal gain, but for the betterment of educating our children,” said Margie Sherratt, who worked with Tam both as an educator and school board member.

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“Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live.” – Mark Twain

The city's new BuildingEye app will make it easier to find planning, building and code enforcement information.

Alameda’s development-watchers have a new tool to help them keep track of development proposals and construction projects on the Island.

Reading Alameda Public Works Director Bob Haun’s May 21 op-ed, “The City Does Employ Engineers for Its Projects,” reminded me of the old adage, “saying it’s so doesn’t make it so.” Mr. Haun does a fine job of laying out the “facts” as he wants you to believe them, but when you scratch the surface of his claims, you uncover the telltale glint of fool’s gold.

Fire Station 3 is positioned on a corner in the center of town. I always liked responding from this station as we covered both ends of the city and didn’t have those infernal ambulances. Built in 1923, it has two single apparatus rooms: one faces Pacific and the other faces Grand.

The Planning Board will consider approvals tonight for a 31-unit apartment building for low-income seniors proposed to be built as part of the Del Monte warehouse development.

It puzzles me that tenant activists should push for private enterprise to subsidize housing through the support of rent controls, and "just cause termination" laws. Housing is a "very basic human right," tenant activists argue, a "human service" fulfilling a vital societal need. Aren't those just the sort of vital services we expect government to provide?

On Sunday mornings when both of us are in town, my friend Larry, his three legged dog Maggie and I go for a walk. We walk at Maggie's pace - which, oddly enough, is not affected by her loss of a leg but by the number of spots visited and marked by other dogs.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your two-sentence local news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Today’s Island city began life as a peninsula where Native Americans — members of the Ohlone tribe — first lived, more than 3,000 years ago.

On Friday, May 15, Mayor Morten Kabell of Copenhagen met with Mayor Trish Spencer and community members.