The Broad Brush: Your News in 60 Seconds

The Broad Brush: Your News in 60 Seconds

Michele Ellson

Welcome to another edition of The Broad Brush, our review of the week’s headlines. Here’s what happened this week.

A state appeals court has decided to reconsider a decision that eliminated portions of a 2008 school parcel tax, a move the attorney representing property owners who sued the school district said was a standard precursor to possible consideration by California’s highest court. If the decision stands, Alameda Unified could be forced to pay property owners back millions of dollars the district collected under the Measure H tax between 2008 and 2011.

A local man is asking the only place on the Island that sells guns to pull semi-automatic rifles like the one used in the Newtown, Conn. school shootings off the shelves. Paul English is collecting signatures for an online petition that he plans to send to the head of Big 5 Sporting Goods.

Four people with more than a century’s combined experience in different aspects of the health care field have applied to fill out the second half of former Alameda Health Care District Board member Stewart Chen’s four-year term, in the wake of Chen’s ascension into a City Council seat. The rest of the board is expected to decide whether Lynn Bratchett, Shubha Fanse, Terrie L. Kurrasch or Tracy Lynn Jensen get the nod on January 28.

Discrimination against non-white renters may be on the decline in some local communities, the results of a newly released audit show, though other audits referenced by the new one showed different results. The results of ECHO Housing’s 2011-2012 audit “represented the lowest amount of discrimination in ECHO’s history of conducting audits,” it said.

News in brief(er): Online fundraiser GiveGoods has closed its doors after less than a year in operation … and startup Imprint Energy is developing ultrathin batteries.

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