LiveBlog: June 5, 2012 election

June 5, 2012 election

11:12 a.m. Wednesday, June 6 Political blogger Steven Tavares over at East Bay Citizen has been watching the Assembly District 18 race closely, and today, he published a post on Rob Bonta's victory in the primary race and the runoff to come between Bonta and second-place finisher Abel Guillen:

Going forward, the Bonta/Guillen race will solely be about winning over voters in Oakland. Guillen may have a slight advantage, but he will also have to attempt shaving a few percentage points off of Bonta's totals in San Leandro and even Alameda. As opponents of Alameda failed sales tax measure showed Tuesday night, there is a contingent of Alamedans who don't like Bonta that could be plucked away by Guillen. And, how will the forces that torpedoed Young's campaign, presumably on behalf of Guillen, turn their guns on Bonta and vice-versa. This race may not only be Bonta vs. Guillen, but Bonta's public safety unions against Guillen's nurses and teachers.

Tavares and I chatted about this over our respective computer screens at the Blue Danube on Park Street last night, so when I talked with Bonta about the results last night I asked him what he thought. In short, he said he's feeling comfortable about his chances in Oakland and that he doesn't expect the unions and other groups that spent close to $100,000 to attack third-place finisher Joel Young to turn on him in the months to come. (Neither Guillen nor Young's campaign manager, Mark Goodwin, replied to requests for comment on Tuesday's results.)

More than half of the voting for the AD18 race will take place in Oakland, Bonta said, and Guillen's campaign website and financial disclosures show he has more endorsements and contributors there than Bonta. But Bonta pressed his experience and message and said they, and not his address, will determine voters' choices at the polls.

"I don’t think I'd give up anything to any candidate in Oakland. My message is as strong in Oakland as it is in San Leandro as it is in Alameda," said Bonta, who finished nine percentage points ahead of Guillen in Tuesday's primary.

As to the California Alliance - the coalition of unions and other groups that sent a flurry of mailers opposing Young in the primary - Bonta said that several of the groups who joined the coalition -which had $344,000 in the bank before the last-minute spending flurry - endorsed him in the primary, including the California League of Conservation Voters (he's also got strong support from attorneys, many of whom contributed to his campaign).

More to come, in the months to come.

8:25 a.m. Wednesday, June 6 Ron Matthews has issued a statement on behalf of Preserving Alameda:

On behalf of the youth sports community of Alameda I am saddened by the lack of support for their sports infrastructural needs. All other communities everywhere in the Bay Area (and everywhere else) have invested in lighted all weather sports fields and good quality swimming pools. Yet here in Alameda there exists a group of people who will say “NO” to just about anything progressive. In my experience we call these people “haters.” What is their plan to get the money to invest in these needs for our youth? Our general fund is deficient, which means it won’t come from there. Sadly, we won’t see the sports field or pool built now for many years to come. I will go further and say we won’t see progress of any kind for many years to come either, including the development of the Alameda Point.

This rather cynical analysis is not sour grapes, this is the truth. We all know it, and we live in a community that is truly divided, much like our U.S. Congress. If I could run for office and change it I would, but the fact remains that our bucolic town is in for hard times ahead. Our infrastructural needs will not be addressed until our deficit is a surplus. We have failed our youth, and they will pay the consequences and so will we. Sad, very sad.

7:12 a.m. Wednesday, June 6 This election heralded two major shifts in the electoral process: New political districts and a new, voter-approved primary system that puts the top two candidates in political races into runoff elections, regardless of party. The San Francisco Chronicle has a good explainer on these changes and their impacts.

Updated 12:37 a.m. Wednesday, June 6

RESULTS

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure; 2/3 vote needed)
100% reporting

Yes: 5,816/50.29
No: 5,748/49.71

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure; 2/3 vote needed)
100% reporting

Yes: 48,325/71.67
No: 19,102/28.33

Assembly District 18
100% reporting

Rob Bonta: 15,245/36.84
Abel Guillen: 11,562/27.94
Rhonda Weber: 6,551/15.83
Joel Young: 7,819/18.9

Superior Court Judge, Office 20
100% reporting

Tara M. Flanagan: 60,711/48.99%
Catherine Haley: 24,090/19.44%
Andrew R. Wiener: 38,142/30.78%

State Senator, 9th District
Loni Hancock: 60,994/96.41%
Write-in: 2,273/3.59%

U.S. Representative, 13th Congressional District
Barbara Lee: 60,500/81.5%
Marilyn M. Singleton: 9,406/12.67%
Justin Jelincic: 4,038/5.44%

7:12 a.m. Wednesday, June 6This election heralded two major shifts in the electoral process: New political districts and a new, voter-approved primary system that puts the top two candidates in political races into runoff elections, regardless of party. The San Francisco Chronicle has a good explainer on these changes and their impacts.

Updated 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, June 5

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
93.33% reporting

Yes: 5,635/50.39
No: 5,547/49.61

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
96.94% reporting

Yes: 47,492/71.64
No: 18,801/28.36

Assembly District 18
92.78% reporting

Rob Bonta: 15,007/36.81
Abel Guillen: 11,422/28.01
Rhonda Weber: 6,428/15.76
Joel Young: 7,716/18.92

Superior Court Judge, Office 20
92.33% reporting

Tara M. Flanagan: 58,013/48.94%
Catherine Haley: 23,072/19.46%
Andrew R. Wiener: 36,508/30.80%

Updated 11:54 p.m. Tuesday, June 5

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
86.67% reporting

Yes: 5,498/50.61
No: 5,365/49.39

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
87.29% reporting

Yes: 45,242/71.30
No: 18,210/28.70

Assembly District 18
92.78% reporting

Rob Bonta: 14,609/36.81
Abel Guillen: 11,098/27.97
Rhonda Weber: 6,293/15.86
Joel Young: 7,487/18.87

Superior Court Judge, Office 20
84.26% reporting

Tara M. Flanagan: 55,212/48.71%
Catherine Haley: 22,131/19.52%
Andrew R. Wiener: 35,100/30.96%

Updated 11:28 p.m. Tuesday, June 5

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
68.89% reporting

Yes: 4,939/50.55
No: 4,831/49.45

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
64.94% reporting

Yes: 39,501/70.55
No: 16,487/29.45

Assembly District 18
64.60% reporting

Rob Bonta: 12,596/37.22
Abel Guillen: 9,369/27.68
Rhonda Weber: 5,377/15.89
Joel Young: 6,334/18.71

Superior Court Judge, Office 20
64.04% reporting

Tara M. Flanagan: 47,952/47.96%
Catherine Haley: 19,642/19.65%
Andrew R. Wiener: 31,578/31.59%

11 p.m.Update:

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
53.33% reporting

Yes: 4,650/50.62
No: 4,536/49.38

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
49.65% reporting

Yes: 35,657/69.86
No: 15,383/30.14

Assembly District 18
50.86% reporting

Rob Bonta: 11,704/37.44
Abel Guillen: 8,512/27.23
Rhonda Weber: 5,070/16.22
Joel Young: 5,815/18.6

Superior Court Judge, Office 20
51.20% reporting

Tara M. Flanagan: 43,536/47.53%
Catherine Haley: 18,065/19.72%
Andrew R. Wiener: 29,259/31/94%

10:25 p.m.Update:

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
24.44% reporting

Yes: 3,885/52.02
No: 3,583/47.98

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
29.41% reporting

Yes: 30,416/69.31
No: 13,467/30.69

Assembly District 18
32.65% reporting

Rob Bonta: 10,160/37.42
Abel Guillen: 7,233/26.64
Rhonda Weber: 4,457/16.42
Joel Young: 5,162/19.01

10:02 p.m. Update:

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)
15.56% reporting

Yes: 3,653/51.86
No: 3,391/48.14

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)
18.35% reporting

Yes: 27,626/68.48
No: 12,717/31.52

Assembly District 18
24.4% reporting

Rob Bonta: 9,608/37.53
Abel Guillen: 6,778/26.48
Rhonda Weber: 4,164/16.27
Joel Young: 4,916/19.2

9:10 p.m. Some notes on the Assembly District 18 race: The three Democratic candidates in the race spent over $600,000 between the start of the year and May 19, and that's not including the nearly $100k spent by a coalition that includes the League of Conservation Voters, consumer attorneys, the California Federation of Teachers and others for polling and mailer opposing AC Transit Board Member at large Joel Young. Alameda City Councilman Rob Bonta's big backers include the state's public safety unions, while Guillen's big checks came from the California Nurses Association, teachers unions and groups of Native Americans. (Young's contributors aren't listed online.)

8:43 p.m.: Updated results:

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)

Yes: 3,268/51.98
No: 3,019/48.02

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)

Yes: 25,333/68.01
No: 11,917/31.99

Assembly District 18

Rob Bonta: 9,003/37.55
Abel Guillen: 6,356/26.51
Rhonda Weber: 3,958/16.51
Joel Young: 4,536/18.92

8:28 p.m. One of tonight's races is for members of the Democratic Party's County Central Committee for the 18th Assembly district. What's that, you say? We asked Jim Oddie, one of the candidates for a seat on the committee, for an explanation.

"The central committee basically is the grassroots foundation of the county party. It oversees the campaign offices, endorses candidates, raises money, and provides volunteers," said Oddie, the only Alameda resident among the candidates. Oddie said a state bill that passed this year allocated seats based on Governor Jerry Brown's vote totals, so voters had the option of chosing 10 members to sit on this committee.

8:12 p.m.We've got some early vote by mail results. They are:

MEASURE C (city sales tax measure)

Yes: 3,268/51.98%
No: 3018/49.02%

MEASURE B (Peralta Community College District parcel tax measure)

Yes: 24,784/67.94%
No: 11,693/32.06%

Assembly District 18

Rob Bonta: 8,802/37.74%
Abel Guillen: 6,137/26.32%
Rhonda Weber: 3,842/16.47%
Joel Young: 4,421/18.96%

8:02 p.m.: Polls are officially closed and we are awaiting results. I visited three polling places across the Island earlier this evening to gather voters' sentiments on the Measure C sales tax increase; we'll have a full story on that Wednesday after tonight's coverage is done.

7:36 p.m. Welcome to our LiveBlog for the June 5, 2012 primary election. We'll keep you updated on tonight's results and more, right when things happen. Stay tuned for the first round of results after the polls close at 8.

Federal election monitors will be keeping an eye on the polls in Alameda County to ensure poll workers are providing adequate language assistance to Latino, Chinese, Vietnamese and Filipino voters. The feds are monitoring elections in four states including California, where they're watching polls here and in Fresno and Riverside counties. The monitoring here in Alameda County comes as a result of a court order, according to press release from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Comments

Al Wright's picture

Thanks Michele!

You're welcome! Late results in a bit.

I value Ron Matthews' dedication to youth sports. Thank you, Ron!

Alameda has more sports fields than many of our neighboring communities; my son plays soccer and little league and his teams have never wanted for a field. We are blessed with an abundance of sports fields.

Also, we Alamedans have great access to swimming pools. I swim laps at Franklin Pool and bring my son there on warm weekends. In the summer, he takes the Red Cross swimming lessons at Emma Hood Swim Center. We are blessed with an abundance of swimming pools.

Let's be thankful for what we have, rather than lament for things that are not practical at the moment. Alameda has great parks and amazing sports programs for our youth (thanks to people like Ron). Even though measure C did not pass, I'm sure that we, as a community, will continue the legacy of community access to pools and fields.

As someone who makes less than $70,000 annually, shops almost exclusively at local stores, and works primarily with low-income youth and families, I did not feel comfortable approving a sales tax increase in our town. I know my neighbors who voted yes on C will still count me as a friend.