Development

With a pair of agenda items going before the Planning Board on Monday, the city’s staff is attempting a grand bargain of sorts that would allow the far West End of the Island to begin its transformation into something other than a shuttered military base.

This bargain must not only prove acceptable in a political climate driven by residents’ concerns about how long it takes them to get through the Posey Tube in the morning, it also needs to stay in compliance with 30-plus years of federal, state and local laws and agreements that govern housing development in Alameda.

 
An eagle-eyed regular reader who noticed that we hadn't updated our development map since December asked if we could revise and repost it. Well, ask and ye shall receive. Here's an update of our popular map, along with an updated chart (attached) listing developments that are both proposed and in progress as well as sites that could someday hold housing.

Authors of a new analysis claim that slow housing growth is a cause of rising rents, saying the nation’s least affordable housing markets are the ones where new housing permits are not keeping up with population growth.

The analysis from home listing site Zillow says rental affordability is “as bad as it’s ever been in the U.S.” due in part to a lack of new, affordable units to meet demand. It lists San Francisco and San Jose as two of the least affordable metropolitan areas in the country; Oakland – which has thousands of new homes in the works – apparently wasn’t studied.

In today’s alert, we’ve got a study session on some proposed Clement Avenue townhomes, forward movement on Fire Station 3 and a discussion on the city’s density bonus ordinance.

The developer behind one of the most prominent, most litigated projects in Alameda has restarted the permit application process. Some key details have changed since his last push, according to newly available documents.

 
Here's an update on our popular Alameda development map, plus an update spreadsheet with more detail on development plans in Alameda. Projects under development include Alameda Landing and Marina Cove II (also known as Marina Shores), which will offer 365 new homes; final approvals for the Del Monte development, which could add another 380 homes to Alameda's housing stock, are expected to be granted by the City Council on Tuesday, while negotiations for development of a waterfront town center with 800 homes, shops, parks and a new ferry terminal are underway.

The City Council offered preliminary approvals for a plan to build up to 380 new homes on the 11-acre Del Monte warehouse, a development that one council member said could offer the last new housing the Island will see for years.

The City Council is due to make decisions regarding the Del Monte warehouse and Alameda Point developments at its next meeting. Here is a look at what’s on the agenda.

The Planning Board is set on Monday to consider signing off on a parking plan for the proposed redevelopment of the Del Monte warehouse.

The parking plan and changes intended to make the streets that surround the Del Monte more bicycle and pedestrian friendly are all that remain subject to the Planning Board’s okay. The City Council is expected to consider final approvals for the development proposal on December 2.

In today’s alert, we’ve got details on plans for shops and townhomes in an old Oak Street warehouse, a planning extension for Mapes Ranch and the latest news about Alameda Point.