News

Photo courtesy of Alameda Municipal Power.

Alameda Municipal Power wants its two dollars (and 25 cents).

The Public Utilities Board voted Monday to raise electric rates effective July 1 as the final part of a five-year program of rate increases designed to cover rising power and transmission costs. Most residents will pay an additional $2.25 a month, which equals a 4.5 percent increase for the average household, while commercial rates will go up 0.125 percent, the utility announced this week.

A New York-based foundation has rescinded a major grant it awarded to Alameda in December, marking a setback in the city’s disaster preparedness efforts.

The city announced Tuesday that the Rockefeller Foundation had withdrawn a promised “resilience” grant – a move so unexpected that some questioned whether the announcement could be an April Fool’s Day joke. But a representative for the foundation confirmed Wednesday that the award had been withdrawn.

At the time it was awarded, a city staffer said the grant award could total $1 million over two years; it was also to include technical assistance for implementation.

Housing advocates are asking the city to consider new rules that could control the rise of rents.

Alameda Police Chief Paul Rolleri said he doesn’t know whether it’s gratifying or horrifying that officers in his department wrote 62 tickets in five hours during a February pedestrian crosswalk sting.

The department is stepping up its efforts to make sure pedestrians cross Alameda’s streets safely and to let the public know the department takes pedestrian safety seriously, and the periodic stings are one of several strategies it’s employing. Other efforts will include safety messages on the department’s Twitter account and Facebook page, a poster contest for Alameda’s students and “May You Arrive Safely,” a safety walk scheduled for May 3.

 
The Alameda Police Department provided pedestrian collision data for 2013 that we've assembled into this map. Data includes the time, date and location of the collisions, plus who was at fault and why.

The city is moving forward with plans to construct a long-sought emergency operations center on former Alameda Belt Line property a block away from a mid-Island fire station.

A plan to use city money and borrowed funds to build a new Fire Station 3 was unveiled before the City Council on Tuesday night.

The City Council unanimously approved a complex land and cash swap deal with the school board and Alameda Housing Authority; we've got the tweet by tweet.

The City Council is slated to vote tonight on a complex land and cash swap deal that will resolve deeds to public trust property on the Island’s northern waterfront, give the school district the money it needs to fix up pools at Encinal High School and hand housing funds and the former Island High School site to the Alameda Housing Authority.

City and schools leaders are set to consider a complex land and cash deal that will resolve a series of long-running disputes put resources into the hands of the agencies that can make the best use of them, staffers who drafted the agreements said.