News

A federal judge who ruled earlier this month that a bankrupt California city’s pensions can be cut like any of its other debts is set to consider a contested exit plan that doesn’t contain pension cuts on October 30.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein ruled on October 1 that Stockton’s pension obligations aren’t more sacred than any other debt the city owes, clearing the way for potential cuts. But city leaders argued in court that they don’t want to cut pensions, fearing that cuts would impact the city’s ability to retain and recruit workers.

Emergency calls placed in the wee hours of September 28 paint a dramatic picture of the impact of a series of fires that ripped through a seven-block radius on and around Park Street, recordings obtained by The Alamedan show.

“There’s a woman screaming for help. There’s a fire in the back of her house. She’s screaming for help. Hurry!” a woman who called at 1:37 a.m. about a fire at a home on the 1300 block of Regent Street told dispatchers.

While on hold, a woman – whether it’s the same caller or another is unclear – can be heard telling another person to go to the neighbor yelling for help.

A few hours north of San Francisco, in the Mayacamas Mountains, sits the world’s largest geothermal field. The Geysers steam field covers more than 2,000 acres and provides electricity to thousands of Californians, and Alameda Municipal Power owns a significant share of its output.

Alameda police are rescinding a ticket they gave a homeless veteran on a charge he was illegally living in his car.

On October 1, the department asked the Alameda County Superior Court to dismiss a ticket issued to Aaron Colyer after police found him sitting in a parking lot in his van. And Alameda’s top cop confirmed the city may revise the ordinance that Colyer, 34, was cited under.

“I'm happy that the City of Alameda has agreed to stop violating the constitutional rights of homeless persons and hope that all homeless people will now come park in Alameda where they will be safe from harassment, threats and intimidation for existing,” Colyer said.

A condo resident seeks an expansion of Alameda County Industries' on-call pickup service, saying it could help curb illegal dumping of mattresses and other big items.

Alameda Point Environmental Report blogger Richard Bangert was so impressed by "the beehive of construction activity" at Alameda Landing development that he snapped these photos.

For more than 14 years, Alameda Family Services has been providing shelter to homeless, runaway and “thrown away” teens in an eight-bed Victorian in Oakland. But the teens may soon find themselves with nowhere to go.

The owner of the home that houses the DreamCatcher emergency shelter has himself fallen on hard times and is preparing to sell it. So the nonprofit is scrambling to raise $100,000 over the next few weeks so that it can purchase the home and keep the shelter – the only one of its kind in Alameda County – up and running.

“He’s very much trying to work with DreamCatcher,” spokesman Sean Sullivan said of the home’s owner.

East Bay water officials approved new restrictions this week that limit watering of lawns and landscaping and other outdoor uses.

Every day, a large, white bus stops in front of Donald Hull’s High Street home.

Updated at 8:32 a.m. Thursday, August 14

Alameda’s top cop says the police department will do more to help homeless people following the release of a video that showed local police ticketing a homeless veteran and suggesting he leave Alameda for Oakland.

Posted in late July, the roughly 14-minute video shows Alameda police ticketing 34-year-old Aaron Colyer on a charge he was illegally living in his vehicle. Police told Colyer he couldn’t sleep in his van, which was parked in a lot near the Main Street ferry terminal, and that he would have to move on.