Politics

Future residential development was on everyone’s mind Tuesday night as a growth-friendly City Council gave way to two new members who support a slower approach to development.

But the old council members didn’t exit without leaving their mark on the city’s landscape. In the final hour of their tenure, the council members approved a plan to develop the site of the former Del Monte warehouse for up to 380 new homes.

While the 4-1 vote was applauded by some in the audience, the lame duck council’s action drew heavy criticism from residents who wanted the new council to decide the matter and sought more time to discuss the proposal.

When an Alamedan reader questioned a statement City Councilman Tony Daysog made Tuesday night regarding a $995,000 upgrade for the Alameda Police Department's dispatch and records system, Daysog responded on Twitter and a lively debate ensued. Here's their exchange.

Members of the City Council voted Tuesday to abandon plans to create a city-sponsored rents task force, opting instead to allow a local attorney to lead a community-based process to explore concerns about rising rents.

The council voted 3-2 to move forward with the community based process; the community group is to report its findings on December 2. Council members didn’t make any decisions about when – or if – they would move forward with an official task force in the future.

The task force proposal was the result of growing concerns over evictions and rising rents in Alameda. More than half of Alameda’s residents are renters.

Alameda's City Council narrowly voted down a proposal to form a city-sponsored task force to examine the nature and impact of rent increases, instead opting to adopt a surprise proposal to proceed with an informal community process. That and more, in tweets.

A pair of Alameda firefighter/paramedics will soon be doing more than just responding to medical emergencies: They will be checking up on the city’s infirm residents after they leave the hospital.

The City Council on Tuesday night signed off on the city’s participation in the Alameda County Community Paramedicine Pilot Project, a county-funded, two-year pilot project to help divert patients from expensive hospital emergency room visits by helping them access community resources and making certain they are practicing good self-care.

The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to rezone federal property near Crab Cove for park use – and to remove contested language from a companion measure council members said was designed to spell out what the council will do if the city is sued over the zoning change.

The City Council okayed an ordinance to rezone federal property near Crab Cove for park use, along with a companion measure detailing how they'll pay for any lawsuit over the change - sans controversial language that would allow the council to reverse the decision. That and more, here.

Proponents of a ballot measure that would rezone 3.9 acres of federal property near Crab Cove for park use are crying foul over a city-drafted companion measure that, if enacted, would give the City Council the power to put their initiative on ice.

“We feel it is an attack on our ballot measure,” said Karin Lucas of Friends of Crown Beach, which drafted the zoning measure. Lucas and a leader of one local environmental group said they may sue if the city’s so-called “fiscal responsibility” measure is enacted.

Bills that would revamp the community college accreditation process and permit worker cooperatives are among the nearly two dozen proposed so far by Alameda Assemblyman Rob Bonta during the second half of the 2013-14 legislative session.

The 22 pieces of legislation that Bonta, who has announced he plans to run for re-election this fall, has introduced since February include bills that seeks to boost the amount of produce available to people living in "food deserts," grant the Oakland Unified School District more time to sell surplus property to help pay off a $100 million loan from the state and grant union-friendly changes to bargaining rules.

City Hall is better organized, the city is greener than ever before and Alameda Point will soon see development after a 17-year wait, Mayor Marie Gilmore said Tuesday during her annual State of the City address.