Politics

Image courtesy of the City of Alameda.

Ferry boats carrying passengers across San Francisco Bay will be coming to Alameda for fuel and maintenance someday soon, the City Council decided Tuesday night.

Council members approved a lease for the long-planned facility and an agreement charging the Water Emergency Transportation Authority with building a new resting area for harbor seals who in habit a portion of the bay they seek to use despite two no votes by Mayor Trish Herrera Spencer, who said the public did not have a chance to comment on the plan since it was presented to the city more than four years ago.

On Tuesday night, the City Council talked about an Alameda Point lease for the Water Emergency Transportation Authority, rents commission rules and more. Here's the tweet by tweet.

City Council members have asked Assistant City Manager Liz Warmerdam to serve as Alameda’s interim city manager when the city’s current manager, John Russo, leaves on May 1.

The City Council voted unanimously last week to offer Warmerdam, who started her municipal career in Alameda and came back as assistant city manager in 2013, the interim city manager’s job. The council will vote on a contract for Warmerdam at a date to be announced.

“I’m looking forward to working with Liz Warmerdam in this capacity. I really think it’s an opportunity for us to get to know her and to see her strengths,” Mayor Trish Herrera Spencer said.

City Council members voted Tuesday to abandon a proposed moratorium on development applications that seek a break on Measure A and other development standards to help facilitate construction of affordable housing.

Instead, city staffers will work to clarify the city’s rules for granting the waivers – and will also begin looking at ways to make sure developers don’t build more homes than the land set aside to accommodate housing development can realistically handle.

The City Council is set to consider leasing a waterfront site that could be home to the first construction project at Alameda Point – a maintenance and operations center for the Bay Area’s public ferry service.

Tonight, the council will consider offering initial approval of a 60-year lease granting the Water Emergency Transportation Authority a spot on West Hornet Avenue to build its planned four-story Central Bay Operations and Maintenance Center. If the council okays the lease, construction of the $45 million to $50 million project could begin in January and the facility could be ready to open by May 2017.

City Council members offered a vote of support Tuesday for the expansion of Crab Cove onto a 3.899-acre federal property across the street that was once slated for housing.

This past Tuesday the City Council talked about plans for Site A, support for a Crab Cove expansion and more. That's all in our tweet by tweet.

City Council members opted early Wednesday to move forward with a set of recommendations for strengthening the city committee that mediates rent disputes – and, over the objections of Mayor Trish Spencer, to consider gathering data on the rent market here and in other cities to inform discussion about additional steps the city could take to protect renters.

The City Council unanimously rejected a proposal Tuesday to rescind the prior council’s approval of the Del Monte warehouse development.

Even Mayor Trish Spencer, who put the rescission discussion on the council’s agenda, voted against a repeal, saying concerns about the project could be addressed by the council in other ways.

Council members Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft and Tony Daysog said the benefits of retooling the development project to address lingering concerns didn’t outweigh the risks of rescinding approvals for it.

Mayor Trish Spencer has asked her dais-mates to consider rescinding a plan to redevelop the Del Monte warehouse into hundreds of new homes and shops.

The new council will consider rescinding the master plan and development agreement for the project, which includes up to 380 homes and 30,000 square feet of retail space on the 11-acre Del Monte property, at tonight’s meeting. The former council approved the development by a 4-1 vote in December, with Councilman Tony Daysog casting the lone “no” vote.