Transportation

A rendering of the Water Emergency Transportation Authority's planned Central Bay Maintenance and Operations Facility at Alameda Point.

THE STORY: The Water Emergency Transportation Authority – which runs the Bay Area’s ferries – plans to build its Central Bay Maintenance and Operations Facility at Alameda Point. The planned facility – a 25,000 square foot building and four underground diesel vaults on a third of an acre on West Hornet Avenue, and 11 boat slips – would house fleet maintenance services, a control center and an emergency operations center for central bay ferry operations.

Bus and ferry riders could see some changes in the cost of their commute.

The Water Emergency Transportation Authority is considering plans to standardize fares across the Bay Area and to raise them 3 percent a year for five years. The agency is holding a series of public meetings to gather input on the proposals, including a meeting from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. June 3 in the Main Library, 1550 Oak Street.

The authority’s board could vote on the proposed fare changes in September and the changes could be put into effect starting in November. A five-year program of increases could begin in July 2015.

BART’s leaders could ask voters for money to help them pay for new train cars and to modernize the rail line’s stations, Alameda’s BART board director told local Kiwanians during a luncheon Wednesday.

Planning a drive to Park or Webster streets? The city is considering changes that they say could make it easier for you to park.

Alameda’s ferry commuters will soon have more Main Street departures to choose from.

Managers of Alameda’s Harbor Bay and Main Street ferry services and city officials are hosting a pair of public hearings this month to gauge riders’ interest in increasing service and to collect the community’s thoughts on ways to improve access to both terminals.

The city will likely soon be seeking a firm to build a long-desired Shore Line Drive bikeway that staffers say will offer a safer route and bay views to cyclists traversing a 1.8-mile stretch of the Island.

The City Council is scheduled on Tuesday to consider approving plans for the project and authorizing a call for bids to build it. Construction is expected to begin in July and take 60 working days.

The city will pay about a half million dollars toward the $971,800 project, with most of the rest of the tab to be covered by a federal grant. Money from the regional Metropolitan Transportation Commission will cover the remaining $46,400 of the project’s cost.

Alameda’s Transportation Commission gave its blessing to a list of changes meant to improve service along AC Transit’s Line 51A route but withheld it for controversial proposed stops in front of a Santa Clara Avenue church, a hair salon and also, Maya Lin School.

Monday’s fact-finding hearing on a threatened AC Transit strike offered a stark contrast between the East Bay bus system’s labor dispute and the one that has raged between BART workers and the regional rail line’s managers.

Caltrans is preparing to make some fixes to the Posey Tube that could make commuting it a little easier for pedestrians and cyclists. But cyclists here said the work is only a small start on what needs to be done.

“Honestly, there is pretty much nothing they can do to the tube that will entice me, personally, to ride or walk through it again on a regular basis,” cyclist Cyndy Johnsen said.

Johnsen said she used to ride her bike through the tube from Oakland every day to get to a job in Marina Village. But Johnsen, now an Alameda resident, said the noise and poor air there are “just too much.”