Transportation

City leaders are set to develop an Island-wide plan to address what one city staffer identified as “the single most debated issue” generated by new development – traffic.

The San Leandro Bay Bridge – better known to locals as the Bay Farm Island bridge – will be getting a bit of a facelift.

The car bridge will be closed nights starting in October. The bike bridge, meanwhile, will be shuttered for some daytime and some evening hours.

Caltrans will give the City Council a preview of the planned $3.4 million rehabilitation project at the council’s meeting tonight.

Last November voters approved Measure BB, which spells out the transportation and transit priorities for Alameda County over the next 30 years and the funding source for these projects: a half cent increase to the previous county sales tax for transportation. The new tax is in place through 2044.

The $8 billion that will be generated by the tax will pay for several major road and transit projects, including a complete reconfiguration of the I-80 Gilman Street interchange in Berkeley and the extension of BART to Livermore, plus an expanded commitment to East Bay paratransit and affordable transit passes for youth and seniors.

The city kicked off efforts to develop the first mile of its long-planned Cross Alameda Trail with a one-hour community meeting to vet its designs Monday night.

A rendering of the Water Emergency Transportation Authority's planned Central Bay Maintenance and Operations Facility at Alameda Point.

THE STORY: The Water Emergency Transportation Authority – which runs the Bay Area’s ferries – plans to build its Central Bay Maintenance and Operations Facility at Alameda Point. The planned facility – a 25,000 square foot building and four underground diesel vaults on a third of an acre on West Hornet Avenue, and 11 boat slips – would house fleet maintenance services, a control center and an emergency operations center for central bay ferry operations.

Bus and ferry riders could see some changes in the cost of their commute.

The Water Emergency Transportation Authority is considering plans to standardize fares across the Bay Area and to raise them 3 percent a year for five years. The agency is holding a series of public meetings to gather input on the proposals, including a meeting from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. June 3 in the Main Library, 1550 Oak Street.

The authority’s board could vote on the proposed fare changes in September and the changes could be put into effect starting in November. A five-year program of increases could begin in July 2015.

BART’s leaders could ask voters for money to help them pay for new train cars and to modernize the rail line’s stations, Alameda’s BART board director told local Kiwanians during a luncheon Wednesday.

Planning a drive to Park or Webster streets? The city is considering changes that they say could make it easier for you to park.

Alameda’s ferry commuters will soon have more Main Street departures to choose from.

Managers of Alameda’s Harbor Bay and Main Street ferry services and city officials are hosting a pair of public hearings this month to gauge riders’ interest in increasing service and to collect the community’s thoughts on ways to improve access to both terminals.