Alameda Family Services

For more than 14 years, Alameda Family Services has been providing shelter to homeless, runaway and “thrown away” teens in an eight-bed Victorian in Oakland. But the teens may soon find themselves with nowhere to go.

The owner of the home that houses the DreamCatcher emergency shelter has himself fallen on hard times and is preparing to sell it. So the nonprofit is scrambling to raise $100,000 over the next few weeks so that it can purchase the home and keep the shelter – the only one of its kind in Alameda County – up and running.

“He’s very much trying to work with DreamCatcher,” spokesman Sean Sullivan said of the home’s owner.

When Alameda High School became home to one of Alameda County’s first school-based health centers, in 1993, its arrival aroused a storm of protest.

“There were certain elements who thought it was a place to distribute condoms,” said Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan, who said she led the early effort to establish a similar center at Encinal High in 1999. “But it’s much more than that.”

Alameda’s school district leaders want to connect West End families with health care, social services and an array of other supports in order to boost students’ academic performance and their families’ well being. And they’ve earned a $20,000 grant to help them plot out partnerships with local civic and community organizations that can provide those services.

A domestic violence task force made up of Alameda city and nonprofit social service leaders started up again this month, after a nearly seven-year hiatus. The aim of the task force is to better coordinate prevention and intervention services for domestic violence victims as funding for such services dwindles, the city staffer managing the task force said.