redevelopment

Welcome to this year’s kickoff edition of The Broad Brush, your 60-second news review. Here’s what happened this week.

State Controller John Chiang’s office recently released 2012 pay, pension and health cost data for California’s city and county employees, offering a detailed breakdown of costs by both employee and department. The Alamedan posted some of the key details Chiang offered up on Alameda’s municipal workforce in this graphic.

Governor Jerry Brown may help City Hall attain one of its key legislative objectives this year: Reclaiming the right to use property taxes to help finance the redevelopment of Alameda Point.

In a budget plan released Thursday, Brown began backtracking off his 2011 elimination of the state’s redevelopment program by offering to expand the use of existing special districts that allow cities to leverage future property taxes for military base reuse.

Architect Rick Williams highlights amenities to be included in a new 19-unit complex for developmentally disabled residents at a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday. Photo by Dave Boitano.

Jack Capon would have been proud of the crowd that gathered Wednesday in a vacant lot on Lincoln Avenue.

Members of Alameda's City Council and representatives of two Bay Area housing nonprofits took part in a groundbreaking ceremony for Jack Capon Villa, a planned 19-unit complex for developmentally disabled adults. Capon, who died 13 years ago, founded Alameda’s Special Olympics and was a tireless advocate for the disabled.

State finance officials are questioning nearly $370 million in payments city officials say they owe on their former redevelopment projects, more than a third of the amount they say their remaining redevelopment obligations will cost.

Most of the payments the state is seeking to disallow, about $303 million, are for future infrastructure and affordable housing at Alameda Point and in other former redevelopment areas on the Island. Finance officials are also questioning another $47 million the city says is due to the Alameda Unified School District for housing and capital projects.

October 5, 2011 was to be a watershed moment in the city’s long struggle to revitalize the defunct Naval Air Station Alameda. That night city leaders signed a new deal with the Navy that would put most of the former base into the city’s hands by the end of 2012, free of the $108.5 million price tag the Navy had demanded in prior years.