Alameda Point

For the past several months, the development and design consortium Alameda Point Partners has been working to refine its plan for Site A, a 68-acre waterfront plot that is proposed to one day hold 600,000 square feet of commercial uses, 15 acres of new parks – and 800 new homes.

The development framework okayed by city leaders in 2014 envisioned the site as a catalyst for revitalization of the Point, a transit-hubbed beacon alerting industry that the Point was open for business. But some Island voters apparently saw something different: A future traffic nightmare clogging Alameda’s bridges and tubes.

Development of Site A (or any portion of Alameda Point) can’t proceed unless four of the council’s five members agree to move forward. So if two council members have already said they oppose building homes at Alameda Point, what are the chances that the development will move forward?

When the federal government shut Naval Air Station Alameda's doors, in 1997, the prevailing wisdom was that cleanup of the toxics the Navy left behind would be complete in a few years, for less than $100 million. Eighteen years and more than a half billion dollars later, the cleanup team working to clear and contain contamination at the federal Superfund site.

Dating back to the last two centuries, Alameda’s history has included farmers who worked the land. At Ploughshares Nursery, that history has come full circle.

The City Council voted Wednesday to approve an exclusive agreement with Alameda Point Partners to negotiate a deal to develop a 68-acre waterfront town center at the former Naval Air Station, despite opposition from residents who think the lame duck council should wait and let the new council decide.

“This is a tough decision. But stalling is not the answer to a tough decision,” Vice Mayor Marilyn Ezzy Ashcraft said.

City staffers have selected a finalist in the contest to develop a waterfront town center at Alameda Point.

The Department of Veterans Affairs officially took ownership of 624 acres of Alameda Point on Monday, which it hopes to transform into a new, one-stop medical and benefits center, a national cemetery and a wildlife preserve.

“We are proud that the new One VA facility will call Alameda home,” Mayor Marie Gilmore said during a public ceremony at the Alameda Theatre & Cineplex that included a color guard, speeches and a video offering the history of the former Naval Air Station and renderings of the planned facilities.

The Department of Veterans Affairs is holding a public ceremony to commemorate the transfer of hundreds of acres of Alameda Point set to serve as a future clinic and columbarium site.

Alamedans rubbed shoulders with city leaders and representatives from a quartet of development teams Monday at an open house designed to give the public a better idea of who may be shaping the future of the former Naval Air Station.

The City Council has signed off on a pair of finalists vying for the right to develop a key piece of Alameda Point.

Alamedans will get the chance to meet representatives from Calgary-based Brookfield Residential and Alameda Point Partners, a group of developers from the Bay Area and beyond, on September 29. Brookfield and Alameda Point Partners are seeking the right to build a 68-acre, mixed-use development with hundreds of new homes, retail, open space and more.

A massive Canadian developer with tens of thousands of lots spread across North America and a group that includes some prominent Bay Area developers have been named finalists in the race to win the right to build a neighborhood of homes and shops at Alameda Point.