Alameda Point

A massive Canadian developer with tens of thousands of lots spread across North America and a group that includes some prominent Bay Area developers have been named finalists in the race to win the right to build a neighborhood of homes and shops at Alameda Point.

The city is contemplating proposals from nine developers who’ve signaled their interest in developing some or all of a planned 150-acre Alameda Point waterfront town center and commercial development area. So who are these developers, and what do they bring to the table?

This year’s tour highlighting toxic cleanup efforts at Alameda Point forsook the technological whiz-bang of prior years’ cross-base bus rides for a more prosaic sight: A gaggle of Caspian terns perched on a sand bar in a restored wetland area that’s part of the 624-acre chunk of the former air station the Navy handed off to the Department of Veterans’ Affairs in June.

The City Council is set to consider negotiating what could be its first land sale at Alameda Point, to a South Bay development team interested in buying barracks that once housed servicemen and five acres of former taxiway that front Seaplane Lagoon.

Wildlife watchers out at Alameda Point got a jolt in May when a section of pier used by harbor seals as a "haul out" where they can rest and nest disappeared.

City leaders seeking redevelopment of Alameda Point say more transit is a key strategy for reducing the amount of traffic new homes and businesses at the Point are expected to generate. But housing advocates have questioned whether there will be enough people living and working on the Point under the city’s existing plan to attract it when the development is done.

A red-hot real estate market coupled with a more aggressive effort to attract new businesses has accelerated interest in the acres of available space at Alameda Point.

The Navy is seeking public input on its decision to halt the cleanup of contaminated groundwater east of Alameda Point after determining the toxins won’t hurt residents, workers or schoolchildren.

A few weeks ago, we put out the call for your questions about the city's plans to develop Alameda Point. (Mostly, you wanted to know about traffic.) City Manager John Russo and his team at City Hall forwarded their answers late last week. Here are your questions, and their answers.

The city is getting ready to seek out developers who could build hundreds of homes, retail outlets, offices or hotels on 150 acres at Alameda Point.

The City Council on Tuesday signed off on the outline of a request for qualifications from prospective developers for two parcels at the Point, and the form of an exclusive negotiating agreement that city leaders hope to use to move forward on development deals.