Housing

Photo courtesy of the Alameda Commuters.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence local news review. Here’s what happened this week.

What do you think the city and its citizens can do to keep everyone safe on Alameda’s streets? Alamedans weighed in.

Updated ay 10:35 a.m. and 2:46 p.m. Thursday, April 23 in BOLD

David Perry was busy when a reporter called him this past Saturday afternoon. He was packing boxes for a move from the Paru Street apartment where he has lived for the past seven years.

In early March, Perry, a mediator and attorney by trade, received a legal notice from an attorney working for his landlord stating that he had 60 days to move out. No explanation was given for the termination of his tenancy, but none is required.

“I made a phone call (to ask), but it wasn’t returned,” Perry said.

Photo by James Astwood.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence local news review. Here are your Alameda headlines for the week.

Firefighters quickly extinguished a vegetation fire that occurred on the 2100 block of Shore Line Drive on Saturday evening, Alameda Fire Capt. Jim Colburn said this weekend. A reader sent us these pictures.

Authors of a new analysis claim that slow housing growth is a cause of rising rents, saying the nation’s least affordable housing markets are the ones where new housing permits are not keeping up with population growth.

The analysis from home listing site Zillow says rental affordability is “as bad as it’s ever been in the U.S.” due in part to a lack of new, affordable units to meet demand. It lists San Francisco and San Jose as two of the least affordable metropolitan areas in the country; Oakland – which has thousands of new homes in the works – apparently wasn’t studied.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, local news review. Here are your Alameda headlines for the week.

City Council members have asked Assistant City Manager Liz Warmerdam to serve as Alameda’s interim city manager when the city’s current manager, John Russo, leaves on May 1. The City Council voted unanimously last week to offer Warmerdam, who started her municipal career in Alameda and came back as assistant city manager in 2013, the interim city manager’s job.

Over the past several months I’ve posted pieces on the phenomenon of rising rents to this blog, in an effort to explain what’s happening with the local rental market, why, and what is (or isn’t) being done to address those issues. (I’ve posted additional stories on rising rents and declining availability outside of the blog; more on those in the paragraphs that follow.)

The story is a big one for Alameda, with potentially broad implications for the face of our community: More than half of the Island’s residents are renters, according to 2010 Census data.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your headlines for the week.

Arthur Weil knows the face of hate. Weil, a former history teacher and Holocaust survivor, spoke before an audience Saturday on the U.S.S. Hornet Museum.

City leaders are set to develop an Island-wide plan to address what one city staffer identified as “the single most debated issue” generated by new development – traffic.

When Angela Hockabout was priced out of her rental home in 2013 after being handed a $450 per month rent increase, she felt like she had nowhere to turn. But thanks to Hockabout, that’s no longer the case for others in her situation.

In September she founded the Alameda Renters Coalition, which provides information and moral support for renters experiencing crisis and also, advocacy for renters’ needs.

“My main thrust is just providing support to renters and helping them find resources to fight rent increases,” Hockabout said.

Welcome to this week’s edition of The Broad Brush, your weekly, two-sentence news review. Here are your Alameda headlines for the week.

Property owners who The Alamedan has interviewed and others who have commented on prior stories in The Alamedan’s running series on rents have said the recent rise in rents is only part of the story of rental housing in the Bay Area. They said the free market cuts both ways, impacting both tenants and landlords.